Preparing the fields at Stour Cross Farm

May 18th, 2012
Well, I'm sure it's here somewhere

Well, I'm sure it's here somewhere

The final preparation before the maize seed is drilled into the ground.

Trouble is – do these two know what they’re doing??

Local Fishing Lakes

May 7th, 2012

View across the Blackmore Vale with Coking FisheriesBeautiful views across the Blackmore Vale in North Dorset.  Our local fishing lakes in the picture only a few minutes down the road.

Explore Dorset by foot or car and be amazed by what it has to offer.

Special Offer – May Bank Holiday

May 1st, 2012

 

Enjoy a week in Melbury or Duncliffe chalets at Stour Cross Farm over the May Bank Holiday, week beginning Saturday 5th May 2012.

Prices reduced by 20%.

Melbury now £473 and Duncliffe £433. Savings of over £100.

Contact Chris on 01747 838183 or email info@deepestdorset.co.uk

 

 

Double Rainbow

April 17th, 2012

Double Rainbow at Stour Cross FarmAnother beautiful rainbow with a second one beside it.

Taken in April 2012

Rainbow at Deepestdorset, Stour Cross Farm

June 12th, 2011
June rainbow

June rainbow

Couldn’t resist taking this photo last week. Caught it just before it disappeared.

Thank You – Hardy Chalet

May 6th, 2011

Picture drawn by Luke Read
Dear Chris & Martin

Thank you very much for making our stay at your farm so welcoming. We all had a lovely time.

Best Wishes and Happy Easter

Rachael, Paul & Luke (5yrs )

Hedge Laying at Stour Cross Farm

March 23rd, 2011

There’s an art to good hedge laying.  As with many things, the theory behind laying a hedge is easy; the practice is much harder – requiring skill and experience. The aim is to reduce the thickness of the upright stems of the hedgerow trees by cutting away the wood on one side of the stem and in line with the course of the hedge. This being done, each remaining stem is then laid down towards the horizontal, along the length of the hedge.

This hedge is over 40 years old and has grown into spindly trees.

This hedge is over 40 years old and has grown into spindly trees.

Whilst Martin and Dave have a few days spare to tidy up the farm, they set to work cutting out old rubbish such as Ivy and side shoots. A chainsaw, CAT and man power is all that’s needed.
Some of the hedge has growth so big, the only answer is to remove it

Some of the hedge has grown so big, the only answer is to remove it

The hedge around most of the farm is over 40 years old and has never been managed except for being trimmed every year. It has grown into tall spindly trees now suffocated by ivy. Every year after heavy winds we find big gaps in the hedge where weakened trees have been blown over.
Coffee break

Coffee break

 

 
Tools down for a well earned coffee

Tools down for a well earned coffee

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

HAPPY NEW YEAR

December 31st, 2010

4 chalets in snow 2 copy

CHRISTMAS & NEW YEAR 2010

November 23rd, 2010

Christmas-advert

Maize Silaging at Stour Cross Farm

October 6th, 2010
Robert, aged 8, standing amongst the maize before it is harvested

Robert, aged 8, standing amongst the maize before it is harvested

October 5th 2010

Having been advised by a maize specialist that the maize needed another week before cutting, our attentions turned to the weather forecast for the next few days.  No rain……please!!   Sadly it did rain but thankfully brightened up just a day or two before the contractor were due to arrive. It was a poor crop this year because there was little moisture for the maize to grow. Martin had to buy in more maize to compensate for the inadequate quantity this year. The last two years have produced some excellent maize forage but that was all down to the wet summers we had. This year, completely different, but from my point of view I was so pleased for my holiday guests that they could enjoy their weeks full of sunshine. Unfortunately one industry suffers whilst another gains.                                         

The maize should be twice the height of my 8 year old son Robert seen in the photo.                           

 
The contractor came with no less than six tractor drivers and trailers as the maize needed to be hauled from several miles away. 
One of the tractor drivers following the forage harvester around the headland

One of the tractor drivers following the forage harvester around the headland

Tractors and trailers ready and waiting

Tractors and trailers ready and waiting

       Click on the youtube link below to view some of the maize silaging.

The video lasts approx 8 mins.  There are a few wobbly bits but Martin was driving at the time!!